Broomcorn harvest

Broomcorn all harvested—and combed and stacked to dry—

Planned to harvest flax as well, but it is still blooming and not ready yet.

“A Taste of Change” on October 20

A Taste of Change: Handwritten Cookbooks and the Stories They Tell Us, a program by Peter G. Rose, will be presented on Saturday, October 20 at 1:30 p.m. at the First Reformed Church of Scotia.

Hand-written cookbooks tell us a lot more than just how a dish is made; they are also documents of social and family history, showing us how a culture was retained over generations with continuing customs and celebrations.

Using Dutch and New Netherland customs and food history as examples, culinary historian Peter G. Rose will discuss a variety of such recipe/scrap books, dating from the late 1600s to the 20th century. Photographs of pages in cookbooks as well as paintings of the 1600s will illustrate the talk.

One of the cookbooks Ms. Rose found in her research is that of Maria (Sanders) Van Rensselaer, which is in the collection of Cherry Hill in Albany. Maria was the niece of John Sanders, whose wife Deborah Glen (1721-1786) was the last Glen to live in the house that is Scotia’s Glen-Sanders Mansion; one of her cookies will be on the menu for the event.

These ideas can apply to cookbooks of other groups as well. The audience is encouraged to bring old family or community cookbooks to share and discuss after the talk.

Following the program guests can sample a selection of Dutch desserts, with most of the recipesfrom these old cookbooks.

The talk is free, with a suggested donation for the food and beverages.

This program is supported by a Humanities New York Quick Grant, the Village of Scotia, and the First Reformed Church of Scotia.
See www.villageofscotia.org for any updates.

Since this is the 360th anniversary of Alexander Lindsey Glen’s settlement on the north shore of the Mohawk, and the 200th anniversary of the founding of the First Reformed Church of Scotia, it is a perfect time to consider our early Dutch heritage and its continuation into the English colonial period.

The First Reformed Church of Scotia is at 224 N. Ballston Ave., Scotia NY.

 

Tales of Collins Lake on October 14

Come outdoors on Sunday, October 14, to enjoy Tales of Collins Lake, a program of stories with Dr. Carl George, at the Lions Pavilion in Collins Park at 1:30 p.m.

Dr. George will draw from the treasure trove of Collins Lake stories he has collected during his many years of research. There are myths, legends, and true stories; tales of birds, fish, and water chestnuts; the natural history of geology, glaciers, and dredging; the human stories of farms, fishing, ice harvesting, and archaeology. Dr. George is Professor of Biology, Emeritus, at Union College.

Even if you know a lot about the lake there will be something surprising.  Be sure to bring your questions!

It was 360 years ago when Alexander Lindsey Glen built his house on the north side of the Mohawk, calling the place Scotia after his native Scotland, and the written history of this lake begins. But its unwritten history has also been told by the archaeology and research done by many professors and students, particularly from Union College. The Collins Lake story starts with the ice age, and much has been learned about how nature has shaped the lake and about the plants and animals that are at home here. The stories also include how humans have impacted the lake and the surrounding areas that have become Collins Park.

The program will be held rain or shine.

The Lions Pavilion is at the eastern entrance to Collins Park on Kiwanis Way. Parking right at the Pavilion is limited, but there is more just past the venue.

This is a Village of Scotia Event, presented by the Village Historian and the Scotia Parks Department.

School Traffic Officers Wanted

The Village of Scotia is seeking applicants for School Traffic Officer.  This is a part-time, seasonal position during the Scotia-Glenville Central School District year (September–June).  The Village provides school crossing services at various locations from 8-9 a.m. and 3-4 p.m. each school day.  The salary is $11.75/hour with no benefits.

This position involves responsibility in stopping and directing vehicular traffic for the protection of children crossing roadways going to and from the Lincoln and Sacandaga elementary schools.  The work is performed independently with occasional direction from Scotia Police Department officers.

Typical work activities include directing traffic at crosswalks, aiding children crossing roadways, stopping traffic when children are ready to cross, and instructing children concerning proper placement and precautions to be taken when crossing a roadway.

Applicants must possess good general intelligence, the ability to be firm and courteous with the public, the ability to get along well with children, the ability to read and write, good hand/eye coordination, good powers of observation, a willingness to work outdoors (sometimes in adverse weather conditions), and physical condition/stamina commensurate with the demands of the position.

All training and equipment will be provided.  Applicants must undergo a background investigation.

If interested, complete an application that can be printed from the “Employment” section of the website, and return it to:

Chief – Scotia Police Department – 4 North Ten Broeck Street – Scotia 12302

Questions should be directed to 518-374-3110, x14.